gray scale photo of a pregnant woman
Birth, pregnancy

The Second Trimester: Exciting Things you MUST Prepare During Pregnancy

Symptoms, Growth, To-Do List During the 2nd Trimester of Pregnancy

So you’ve crossed the threshold of the first 13 weeks of pregnancy and entered into the 2nd trimester. Congrats! Maybe now it is feeling real. Hopefully, the nausea and some of the initial symptoms of the first trimester are subsiding. You are feeling more energetic again. Maybe you are ready to prepare for birth and life after baby. Let’s talk about what you need to know and do in the second trimester.

When is the Second Trimester?

The second trimester starts at week 14. The average length of pregnancy is 40 weeks and so each trimester is approximately 13 weeks. As the second-trimester starts, so do new stages in your pregnancy. Weeks 14-27 of your pregnancy are a great time to focus on preparing for life after the baby arrives.

During this season of your pregnancy, you can expect that your uterus will continue to expand.  Your body will experience some aches (chiropractors can be great!), your skin may start to show stretch marks, and skin changes and you will likely start to feel the baby move!

Symptoms of the Second Trimester of Pregnancy

During the second trimester, if you are lucky, you may get a break from some of the pregnancy symptoms you experienced early on. However, there are still many changes happening in baby and in you. Your belly will continue to grow and likely really pop during this time. Your hormones continue to fluctuate and your body continues to adapt to the caring for the baby growing inside.
Some of the symptoms you may experience include (but are not limited to):
-Leg cramps/Charlie horses (these were one of my worst pregnancy symptoms!)

-Dizziness/lower blood pressure

-Round ligament pain

-Varicose veins

-Swelling (especially ankles and feet)

-Tender breasts

-Nasal congestion

-White/clear vaginal discharge

-Dental problems

Learn more about your Baby’s Development During the 2nd Trimester here!

Start Preparing for Baby’s Arrival During the Second Trimester 

The second trimester is a great time to use your energy to prepare for the baby’s arrival. Yes, you want to prepare for labor and delivery. Also, you want to prepare for all the changes that come after the baby is born. A birth plan is great, but do not forget to create a postpartum plan as well.

Preparing Your Body For Birth During the 2nd Trimester of Your Pregnancy

When it comes to preparing your body for birth, this means taking care of your wellness while also prepping the body for the work of delivering a baby. Continue your exercise routines as you and your medical provider feel comfortable. Continue to prioritize proteins, healthy fats, complex carbs, fibers, and vitamins.

You want to prepare your core and vagina for birth. This means working with an expert in prenatal exercise, practicing visualization and pelvic floor movement for birth, and perhaps getting your partner involved with perineal massages.

Preparing Your Home For Birth During the 2nd Trimester

When you come home with the baby, you want to make things accessible and easy so that you have the time to rest and recover as needed. This is a great time to think about a snack and water basket for when you are trapped on the couch, easy access to diapers and feeding items, and food that you (or your partner or support person) can easily prepare. If you have a home with steps, ensure that you can remain on one floor for the first couple of weeks as your body recovers. Another way to prepare is to stock your bathroom with a basket full of the postpartum recovery times you will need.

Another part of preparing your home is preparing for the logistics. Who can help by bringing food? Who can help with pet or sibling care? Will you utilize the service of a postpartum doula or other helping professional? Have these conversations with your partner and do the research so that you can make the most empowering decisions for you and your family.

Learn more about your Baby’s Development During the Second Trimester here!

Preparing your Finances/Work-Life for Birth During the 2nd Trimester

As you prepare for your baby to be born, you want to know what the leave policies are for your place of employment as well as your partner’s (if applicable.) Talk with your HR department and get all the information on what is available to you and what you need to do in order to ensure you can take full advantage of your benefits.

This is also a good time to have a conversation with your partner and make a plan about finances. With a baby can come more unexpected situations and expenses and working to set aside money for the “what ifs” is a wise choice. While it can be tempting to go all out on nursery decor and onesies, work to find a balance that feels comfortable for you and your partner.

Preparing Your Mind For Birth During the Second Trimester

The hormones, lack of sleep, myriad of transitions… they can be difficult mentally as you adjust to new motherhood. During the second trimester, spend time asking about and learning your family history around mental health struggles. Also take this time to learn the signs of PMADS (Perinatal Mood and Anxiety Disorders). PMADs can show up during pregnancy as well, so be alert of your mental wellbeing.

Preparing Your Relationship For Birth in the Second Trimester of Pregnancy

While it is really beautiful to see your partner step into parenthood, there are also challenges like less time together, lack of sleep, changes in intimacy and decisions to make for the baby and your family. In preparing your relationship for birth, start the conversation about how you can share the load of household responsibilities, research that needs to be done, communication with friends and family. Take this time to list out things that make you feel connected to one another so that you can tap into those things when you need to.

As you move through the second trimester of your pregnancy and weeks 14-27, there are many things you can start researching, discussing, and preparing for so that you can move into parenthood with more understanding and preparation. While you can never be prepared for and control all aspects of having a baby, you can be proactive so there are less surprises!

If you are in the second trimester, join a kick-ass group of ladies preparing for life after baby with intention and honest conversation. Head to the group coaching page and find the next session of Postpartum Planning Group. If there’s not a group that matches your time needs, you can always do the self-paced eCourse as well!

benefits of making a postpartum plan in the second trimester of pregnancy
Birth, pregnancy

First Trimester: How to Handle it and What To Do

Maybe it was feeling morning sickness or perhaps you missed your period. Maybe you just felt different and thought to take a pregnancy test. No matter how you learned you were pregnant, the realization makes you think about all the things to do in the first trimester. Let’s not forget, all the things to avoid during the first trimester.

I’m not going to give you a lecture or 20-point to do list, but let’s talk about how you can start taking care of yourself and that growing baby in the first trimester weeks.

To learn more about the first trimester timeline and baby’s development, check out my post on the Zulily Blog about Baby Development During the First Trimester.

Pregnancy Trimesters

There are 3 trimesters in pregnancy and a “fourth trimester” which describes the first 3 months after you have your baby. The weeks of the pregnancy trimesters are:

First trimester: 0-13 weeks

Second trimester: 14-26 weeks

Third trimester: 27-40 weeks

The first trimester may not look like a lot of change on the outside, but a lot is happening as baby grows and your body changes to take care of your new baby.

What do I Need to Do in the First Trimester?

Enjoy your cravings and also work in nutritious choices.

It can be fun and curious when you have strange cravings. I first thought I might be pregnant when I came home from work and put hot sauce on a spoonful of peanut butter. Yep, pregnant. I also tried to make a salt and vinegar ice cream. That did not work very well. Enjoy those cravings and have fun with it! When it comes to working in nutrition choices during the first trimester, work in vegetables, fruits, fibers and lean meats if you consume meat.

Avoid fish high in mercury, don’t eat cat litter (but really let someone else handle the cat litter) and stay away from anything that you think could give you an infection from being uncooked or unpasteurized. It is also wise to try to cut back on caffeine. This can be hard since you may be feeling so tired, but work to reduce intake. This is also a good time to start prenatal vitamins and folic acid. First trimester sickness (morning sickness but it can hit at anytime of the day!) can make it hard to eat and drink enough, so keep some healthy snacks and water nearby at all times (this is a water bottle that I happen to love). Oh and stop any tobacco, alcohol or drug usage. If you need help stopping, find a program nearby to assist you (getting help is always better than suffering alone!).

Find a trusted provider

Your pregnancy and birth team is very important. If you do not have a trusting relationship with your current provider, it is okay to switch to someone that makes you feel more confident. Find a provider that will listen to you, has an approach to pregnancy and birth that you align with, and will help you understand all the changes and choices you will experience. If you have a history of anxiety or depression, or are feeling depressed during pregnancy, ensure that you have a good relationship with your provider and can bring these things up.

Give yourself permission to rest

Chances are you will feel fatigue throughout pregnancy, but it can be most evident in the first trimester. While you are cutting back on caffeine, you can also be adding in rest. Let go of something on your to-do list and add in a nap. Communicate with your partner (if applicable) that all the hormone and body changes mean you need more rest.

Protect yourself from getting overwhelmed by comparison

It can feel like there are hundreds of things to do after you find out you are pregnant. You may get tempted to download every app and join every Facebook group. Figure out what makes you feel seen and connected and identify anything that traps you in comparison. If you love bump pics and fruit sizes, great, but if you do not, that is okay too.

You do not have to do everything possible to have a good and loving pregnancy. Check out our free Facebook group for the space you need for REAL talk about postpartum- preparation, education, advocacy, communication, connection. We help you prepare for life after baby and support you through the first year with resources, small group coaching, 1-on-1 consults, courses

Plan your parental leave

Start to explore parental leave at your place of work and your partner’s place of work. Look into your contract and any HR policies to see what will be available to you. Plan accordingly so that you are able to have a leave.

Related: Communication after baby

Should I Announce My Pregnancy in the First Trimester?

Deciding if and when to announce your pregnancy is a very personal choice. Some people will tell you that you HAVE to wait until after 12 weeks, when the risk of miscarriage declines. You do not have to wait. It can be very valuable to have people in your corner no matter what the outcome of your pregnancy is- we need community in our joy and in our pain.

Some people will tell you to announce right away and make it big. You do not have to do that either. If you want to keep your pregnancy intimate, that is totally fine.

If you and your partner do not agree on when to disclose your pregnancy, spend time communicating, discussing your values, and working to find a compromise. Sometimes an outside counselor or trusted friend can be a good third party to help you talk through it.

Related: Communication after baby

woman looks for a doctor during the first trimester

Preparing for Birth and Postpartum

When you find out you are expecting, you want to think about birth preparation and postpartum preparation. Birth preparation includes your preferences for how and where you birth. Postpartum preparation includes setting yourself up for success with life after baby and the transition home and beyond.

Birth prep can be completed via an online course like Birth It Up or at your hospital or through a local birth educator.

Postpartum prep is more difficult to find. At Postpartum Together, we offer an eCourse paired with a small group to guide you through making a postpartum plan so that you and your partner can be prepared for bringing home baby, having support, staying connected in your relationship and more.

Everyone has their own idea of first trimester tips. Prioritize taking good care of yourself, getting in tune with your body, establishing important relationships with your support team and learning about the changes happening in you and your baby.

making a plan for postpartum
Postpartum, pregnancy

Disappointment as a Mom: How Gender, Birth Plans & Health Impacts New Moms

Gender disappointment and Birth Disappointment

In the taboo ABCs of postpartum D is for disappointment.

Disappointment can come a lot of ways when it comes to being a new mom. And we’re actually going to back this up and even talk about what disappointment can look like in pregnancy. This can impact our confidence and more specifically, our self judgment and criticism as new moms. Moms may feel sad about the outcome of something but those feelings can cause shame.We’re talking about gender disappointment, medical disappointment, and birth disappointment.

Maybe it’s just not being ready to be a mom yet.
Maybe it’s the disappointment of how something has gone differently than the way you anticipated.

The struggle I see here is that we don’t often feel okay to have joy and disappointment coexisting with gratitude. Many new moms have this feeling of grief and disappointment over how something has gone.

Gender Disappointment

Gender disappointment is one that is common one that I experienced myself. I always picture myself as a boy mom. And so when my second turned out to be a girl, for a while, I was disappointed. I couldn’t imagine what that would look like. It wasn’t what I had envisioned for myself. I was excited to have her. I love her to pieces now, but I did feel a little bit of that gender disappointment.

Whether it’s at a gender reveal party, or whether you wait to find the gender of your baby at birth, you can feel this disappointment, probably because you pictured it one way and it turns out to be another. If you really wanted a boy and find out you are having a girl of if you wanted a girl and found out you are having a boy, you can feel sad.

Medical Disappointment

You also may experience disappointment with something medical, maybe you’re in the NICU with your baby. Maybe there was something that became unexpected about your baby, and you’re just feeling this disappointment about things not being the way you pictured. When I gave birth again to my daughter, my first week was spent in the NICU and that is not how I envisioned it, I was disappointed. I was disappointed that there were medical complexities. I was scared, I was nervous. And I was also just feeling this loss of how I envisioned things.

Related: Being a heart mom

Disappointed in Birth Plan Not Happening

You may also experience disappointment about the way your birth went. Perhaps you had a birth experience that was way different than you anticipated. Maybe you planned for a certain way of birth, maybe you had your birth plan, maybe you had everything prepared.
And then it went differently. I hear this often from clients who planned a vaginal delivery had a belly birth (csection). I also hear this from women who planned unmedicated birth and end up with an epidural or other medical interventions. If you feel like your birth plan failed, you can be disappointed by the birth and your birth story.

Related: Hospital Unmedicated Birth Story

How to Address Disappointment in Pregnancy, Birth and Postpartum

So I want to talk about a few ways that we can address disappointment: whether it’s gender disappointment, birth disappointment, medical disappointment, or just circumstantial disappointment. I want to give you three tips on how to handle disappointment, whatever kind you might be facing.

  1. Get it out

One is to find a safe space to get it out of your head, maybe you’ve been carrying this thought and feeling guilty about it or not having a place to put it. This might be trusting in your partner or a good friend or a therapist. And if that doesn’t feel comfortable to you, that’s okay, you can write it out in a private place or find some way to get it from here (your head), out there so that it’s not just swirling around in your brain anymore. So that first step is to find a place to get it out.

2. Make peace with your disappointment and gratitude

Your second step is to tell yourself that it’s okay to have disappointment and gratitude and thankfulness. At the same time, you can be both disappointed and grateful for how things are. Give yourself the space to have both of those experiences at the same time.

3. What is possible because of the disappointment?

And third, I want you to ask yourself, what is possible because of the disappointment. So anytime we are disappointed it’s because something came or is that we didn’t expect so give yourself the space to consider this- write it out or talk about what is able to be because of the disappointment that you faced.

Disappointment is probably more common than you thing. Gender disappointment, circumstantial disappointment, birth, disappointment, all of these things happen because we picture in our head the way things are going to go. We are dreamers and have a vision and maybe sometimes that’s wrapped up in a little anxiety. We have an idea of how we think things will go, how we want them to go and how they should go. And so it’s natural and okay for you to have some disappointment when things don’t match up with the way you want them to. Give it some space. Give it a name. Identify the things that you can feel at the same time and then realize what is and what has come out of that unexpected disappointed experience.

Related: More than a mom

If you need a place to process the changes of new motherhood, a place to say the hard things and connect authentically with others, check out Postpartum Together Small groups. I help women just like you find peace and empowerment in the season after having a baby. I want you to be a confident, connected momma too.

pregnancy

Pregnancy Memes: Hilarious Memes New Moms Need in Each Trimester

What are the stages of pregnancy?

As you track your pregnancy week by week, you likely know what size fruit your baby is or what should happen on your pregnancy trimester timeline. Sometimes, though, you need a relatable laugh from pregnancy memes for each trimester. Here they are to get you through when the weeks feel like years and the symptoms feel unrelenting. 

If you’re wondering what you can expect each trimester for mom and baby, you can check out my post over on the Zulily blog where I break down the stages of pregnancy, timeline of the weeks and all the changes. 

We know every pregnancy is different, but there are a lot of changes to expect as you go through each month and week of pregnancy, so here are some laughs to help you through.

three pregnancy trimester description
t

First Trimester of Pregnancy Memes

The first trimester is the land of morning sickness, tender breasts, increased visits to the bathroom and probably a lot of fatigue. Your body is creating a human, so that’s cool. As this happens you’ll have a roller coaster of emotions that impact your body in many different ways. Is your partner calling you moody while you are running to the bathroom trying to decide if you need to pee or puke next? Might be time to take that pregnancy test.


I knew I was pregnant the moment I tried to eat hot sauce and peanut butter in the same bite… and it was confirmed by the pink lines shortly after. Some women notice pregnancy symptoms before a missed period, some can go weeks without realizing they are pregnant. Either way, each journey is filled with some surprise and a variety of emotions as you prepare for this big change.
Related: Myths about motherhood

first trimester is like one long all day hangover meme
woman being sarcastic about first trimester smptoms
peeing all the time in first trimester meme

Second Trimester of Pregnancy Memes

The second trimester brings a growing belly and boobs and is sometimes accompanied by new aches and pains (charlie horses drove me crazy!), skin changes, dental changes, and more. It is also when most moms start to experience the baby kicks. Some even call it the “golden” trimester but that’s still out for your own interpretation. I remember the second trimester as more energy, more cravings and more heartburn. Oh, and leggings. Lots of leggings. Check out some of my favorite clothes for pregnancy and beyond.

woman realizes she cannot shave her legs anymore while pregnant meme
kick me baby one more time brittney spears meme

Third Trimester of Pregnancy Memes

While the third trimester is the last trimester of pregnancy, that doesn’t mean it feels quick. The third trimester is the start of braxton-hicks cramping, often back aches, swelling and that frequent urination again. I remember the third trimester being back and forth- days when I tried to sit back and soak it up and days I just wanted pregnancy to be over. And still, lots of leggings.

what size pants do you wear? leggings
there isn't room for both of us anymore said all of my internal organs to my growing baby bump
each

When you’re moving through the trimesters of pregnancy and preparing for birth remember no two pregnancies are the same and in the midst of it all, find some time and space to laugh. Want to know exactly how you and baby are growing through the three trimesters?
Check out my post on the Zulily blog with all the info.

The Fourth Trimester

Wait, another trimester? The fourth trimester is the time after you have your baby. This refers to baby adjusting to life outside of the womb and mom’s recovery. We love all things life after baby here at Postpartum Together and you can find lots of stories in the Postpartum category. During this time you also have a postpartum check up to make sure you are healing and adjusting!

Postpartum, pregnancy

New Mom Therapist: Guide to Finding a Maternal Therapist You Can Trust

Finding Counseling Support for Perinatal Mental Health: Pregnancy and Postpartum

how to find a therapist when you have a baby

Having a baby changes many areas of your life- it changes your body, your mind, your energy, your relationships, your work, your identity. In the midst of these big transitions, many women benefit from having an outside perspective from a professional maternal health therapist. However, when you are knee-deep in new motherhood, it can be difficult to know where to turn.

If you are currently pregnant, I recommend utilizing a postpartum plan (free checklist download) to make sure you are thinking about your postpartum needs and prepare resources ahead of time.

When I realized I needed therapy, the last thing I wanted to do was reach out and ask friends for recommendations- I didn’t want to start a conversation about what is supposed to be the best time of my life by saying I was struggling and needed help.

Why it Can be Hard to find a Maternal Therapist

My brain was already fried on a daily basis and the thought of researching and looking for a maternal health therapist felt like a job I couldn’t take on. With so many things calling for my time and attention, I struggled to justify using that time for my own needs and care. If you’re feeling this way:

1. You aren’t alone, even when it feels like it
2. I’ve compiled ideas and resources to help ease the journey for you

Related: What Is Maternal Ambivalence?

how to find a therapist after you have a baby

What do you need in a maternal health therapist?

If you are a mother (or pregnant), you want a therapist who is trained in perinatal care. This is important because while not all of your conversations will be about the pregnancy, birth, postpartum journey, there are many changes in a woman during this time that has an impact on experience and you want a professional who understands that. You may also have strong preferences regarding a therapist’s background and areas of expertise.

Is faith important to you in this process? Look for someone who has an aligned faith background.
Does sexuality play a big role in your relationship and life? Find a therapist who has an understanding and an inclusive practice.

Do you have previous trauma that may be forming your life now? You want a therapist who has trauma training.

Not all therapists have the same approaches, values, etc. and you can be selective about what is most important to you.

What logistics do you need to consider when finding a maternal health therapist?

What are your scheduling needs? Are you at home? Will you be returning to work soon? Are you a working mom? Do you have childcare options?

Think about what logistics are non-negotiable and what you can alter in order to make this work. If childcare is an issue, you will want to ask the therapy office if you can bring your baby with you. Perhaps you can ask a friend to swap childcare with you so that you can both have a free afternoon to tend to your own needs. If you’re working or going back to work- what scheduling do you need to consider to make ongoing appointments work?

Would virtual appointments be more well-suited for you than in-person?

Related: Postpartum During Coronavirus


online search for therapist in your area

Where are the trained professionals in your city?

You can use Psychology Today and/or Postpartum Support International to guide your search for a good therapist. 

Using Psychology Today (Specific to United States)

  1. On PsychologyToday.com, enter your city and it will populate a list of therapists

  2. On the left side bar you can filter by specifics.

  3. You want to make sure to filter for “Pregnancy, Prenatal, Postpartum” under “issues.”

  4. On this side bar you can also filter for faith, sexuality, language, therapy type, ect. to increase your chances of having a good fit with your therapist.

  5. Browse therapist profiles- look at their areas of expertise, experience and the language they use to describe their practice.

  6. Look at the therapist accepted insurance plans if you are planning to utilize insurance benefits

  7. If someone feels like a good fit, call and see if he/she is accepting new clients

Related: What Is Postpartum Anxiety?

Using Postpartum Support International (Directions are in US terms, but international support is also available by country)

  1. On Postpartum Support International home page, click the “Find Local Resources” button
  2. Select “United States Map”

  3. Select your state

  4. Find a coordinator in your area

  5. Call and tell them you are looking for a perinatal trained therapist near you. They will help you find someone.

find a therapist trained for postpartum or pregnant women through postpartum support international

Finding a maternal health therapist to help you work through your big life transitions is one of the strongest things you can do. By taking this step you not only help yourself, but you allow yourself to be the best version of YOU for those you love.

If you are pregnant and thinking about your postpartum care and needs- good for you! Preparation and planning is such an important part. Part of my speciality is helping you walk you through the areas of transition. This postpartum planning eCourse was designed to give you a postpartum plan to help you think about what you “don’t know you don’t know” about postpartum, have a support team ready, be proactive in your relationship and more!

how to plan for postpartum- preparing for life after baby
Birth, Postpartum, pregnancy

DIY Padsicles: How to Make Frozen Pads for Postpartum Recovery

Make Your Own Frozen Pads for Postpartum Recovery Care

After giving birth, your body has a lot of healing to do. If you delivered vaginally, or delivered by cesarean but did some pushing and laboring, you may have swelling and tearing of your perineum. (The perineum is the area between the anus and the vulva.) Padsicles will be a key to alleviating pain and healing as a postpartum mom.

Postpartum bleeding is normal and most women experience vaginal pain after delivery. Think about it- you removed a human from your body- it’s going to take some time to let that heal! You may experience painful urination after delivery and general pain in that area. This is why padsicles can be such an important part of your postpartum recovery kit, and they are easy to DIY (and cheap!)

I’m going to tell you what you need to make DIY Padsicles, why you’ll love them and when to use them!

This post contains affiliate links which means, at no additional cost to you, I may get a commission for the products recommended.

padsicles ingredients.JPG

What You Need to Make Homemade Padsicles:

Homemade padsicles are an easy way to aid your healing after birth. You only need 4 things, although some women like to add a 5th ingredient. (Find all of these in my quick Amazon Postpartum List)

  1. Maxi pads

    You can choose what size (or sizes) you want to use. In the video, I am using a large hospital pad. However, this will work with any store-bought maxi pad. I recommend getting one that is long enough to fill your underwear and thick enough to hold the witch hazel and aloe vera.

  2. Witch Hazel
    Witch hazel is anti-inflammatory making it a safe soothing topical remedy. Witch hazel is often used to treat sunburn, razor burn, bug bites, hemorrhoids and more. It is traditionally known to have a soothing effect on the skin.

  3. Aloe Vera
    Aloe vera is known to reduce swelling and itchiness. It has a cooling and soothing effect, making it a great part of padsicles for vaginal relief. Aloe vera is also healing for wounds, which is good news for a new mom with a painful vagina.

  4. Freezer-safe bag and/or pad wrapper

    When using a standard store-bought pad, you want to leave the wrapper on while making the padsicle and wrap it back up for freezing. If you use one that does not have a wrapper, or choose to remove the wrapper, you can simple roll the pad and place in a freezer-safe bag. Once you’ve finished your batch of padsicles, it’s easiest to put into a large freezer-safe bag and store in the freezer until they are needed.

  5. Essential oils
    Some women like to add essential oil such as lavender to their padsicles. This may be an added benefit, however, the witch hazel and aloe vera will be enough for the healing mom.

My “recipe” is to squirt them until the pad is adequately wet and will freeze well. I do not measure. However, if you love to measure, here’s a suggestion:

Step by Step Making Padsicles

  1. Unwrap the pad, but leave the wrapper attached so that it can recover the pad after you complete the padsicle

  2. Start with witch hazel. Saturate the pad- 3 to 4 tablespoons worth.

  3. Add the aloe vera. Use 2-3 tablespoons worth.

  4. Add a couple of drops of lavender oil if you’d like.

  5. Use a spoon or stir stick to spread evenly over the pad.

  6. Fold the pad and cover with wrapper.

  7. Put in freezer safe bag and into the freezer until they are needed.

  8. Pull them out and enjoy the relief after baby.

When To Use Frozen Pads After Delivery

Vaginal pain will likely continue for 5-14 days. As time progresses, if you are getting rest and being easy on your body, the pain should decrease each day. Padsicles are great for the first few days after you get home. Personally, I have made 1 pack of maxi pad padsicles for my postpartum recovery and they were more than enough for my healing. I wore them throughout the day for 4-5 days after coming home from the hospital. While in the hospital, take advantage of the ice packs they have available as well as tucks pads and any other accessible recovery items.

Alternatives: How to Buy Them Instead

If you don’t want to make padsicles at home, and you want to have an equivalent, you’re in luck! There are a few products on the market that help with postpartum recovery.

Frida Mom Perineal Pad Cooling Liners

DIY Padsicle Kit

Dermoplast Pain & Itch Spray

Tucks Md Cooling Pads

Reusable Perineal Ice & Heat Packs

Earth Mama Herbal Perineal Spray

Are you preparing for a new baby? Postpartum is an exciting time, and it can come with a lot of unexpected. I’ve taken the guesswork out of it and am helping women like you prepare for an empowered postpartum. How do you set up your support team? What conversations do you need to have with your partner beforehand? What red flags should you look out for? How do you prepare to still take care of YOU while taking care of a baby? I’m letting you in on it all in the My Empowered Postpartum eCourse.